Gia Đình Phật Tử Việt Nam Trên Thế Giới: Anh Ngữ (English)

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Anh Ngữ: Kids' Games

Slip the Bean (indoor game)

Players: 5 or more
Materials: 10 dried beans for each player

Play this game in a room where nobody can escape. Give each player 10 beans, one of which will always stay hidden in the palm of the hand. Tell the players that they all have to get acquainted by shaking hands, and when a player shakes hands with the tenth person, he slips that player his bean. And he continues to shake hands to get rid of the other nine beans. The point of the game is to get rid of all your beans before anyone else does.

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Ngày 28 tháng 04 năm 2011 (3273 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: “The Joy of Living and Dying in Peace”

              dalai lama...the unwholesome deeds we have ac*****ulated will remain behind. Even though many of our friends and enemies have died, the negative deeds we ac*****ulated in relation to them will always abide in our minds as long as we do not adopt antidotes to purify and remove them. The disturbing emotions and the negative deeds they gave rise to will remain fresh in our minds until we purify them.
 
Because we have never understood our fleeting nature, we have never understood that we are only going to live for a short time.

Because of this lack of realization, out of ignorance, attachment, and hatred, we have engaged in various kinds of unwholesome deeds. We have displayed indifference toward neutral sentient beings, attachment toward friends, and anger, jealousy, and hatred toward our enemies. We have ac*****ulated negative deeds like these for a long time. At the same time, our live have been ebbing away and coming to an end. The day will not wait, the night will not wait. Minute by minute, second by second, time is being consumed and our lives are ebbing away. Our lives are constantly approaching their ends.

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Ngày 25 tháng 04 năm 2011 (3518 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: “What If?” Guidelines For Choosing A Buddhist Teacher


How should you go about choosing a Buddhist teacher? Lewis Richmond has some smart suggestions for you in this full article from the “Going It Alone: Making It Work as an Unaffiliated Buddhist” section of the Spring 2010 issue of Buddhadharma — at your favorite newsstand now.


You may be perfectly content to study and practice the dharma on your own, without a Buddhist teacher or community. But the time may come when you feel that isn’t enough, and you decide you want to seek one out. If that happens, how do you go about finding a teacher (and by extension, a community) that’s right for you?


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Ngày 19 tháng 04 năm 2011 (3766 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Valuable Advice...

Valuable advice...
 
"I always knew I was going to be rich..

I don't think I ever doubted it for a minute" 
- Warren Buffett



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Ngày 14 tháng 04 năm 2011 (5197 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Animal Rights and Buddhism


"The Question" recently at the Washington Post's On Faith website was "do animals have rights?" Typically for this site, none of the answers are from Buddhists. So I began to think about how I would answer the question.

From a Buddhist perspective, it seems to me the tricky part of this question is not "animals," but "rights." The concept of rights developed in western civilization over many centuries and came to fruition during the 17th century or so, in the work of Enlightenment philosophers such as John Locke.  But there was no such concept in the world 25 centuries ago, during the time of the Buddha.


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Ngày 12 tháng 04 năm 2011 (3540 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Landscape in Netherland

At first glance, it looks like a giant child armed with a box of crayons has been set loose upon the landscape. Vivid stripes of purple, yellow, red, pink, orange and green make up A glorious patchwork. Yet far from being a child's sketchbook, this is, in fact, the northern Netherlands in the middle of tulip season.  
 The Dutch landscape in May is a kaleidoscope of color as the tulips burst into life. The bulbs are planted in late October and early November.  More than three billion tulips are grown each year and two-thirds of the vibrant blooms are exported, mostly to the U.S. and Germany .


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Ngày 10 tháng 04 năm 2011 (3387 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: How is your day going?

Makes you feel pretty thankful...


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Ngày 06 tháng 04 năm 2011 (5596 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Kids' Games

Peanut Pitch (indoor game)

Players: 2 or more

Materials: 5 unshelled peanuts for each player, 3 bowls of different sizes that you can nest

             Place the smallest bowl into the next smallest, and place both of those bowls into the larger bowl. Fill the center bowl with water, but pour just a little water into the surrounding bowls. If any of the bowls float, add more water to the center bowl and remove water from the surrounding bowls.


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Ngày 01 tháng 04 năm 2011 (4315 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Top 10 Buddhist Teachers Living in America


New York, USA -- Wanna get you some meditation, some peace, some wisdom? Wanna do a weekend program where you learn how to calm and open your mind to...reality?


Buddhism--tested over 2,500 years in dozens of diverse cultures--is worth a go. This "non-theistic" (read: it's up to you) religion comes in dozens of styles--Zen, Theravada, Tibetan--but it's always, at its root, about learning to be a good, sane, peaceful, compassionate person. Still, finding the right teacher for you is an age-old task--made somewhat easier by online teaching schedules, hundreds of wonderful Buddhist books (why, only a generation ago there were only a few tomes to choose from).

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Ngày 26 tháng 03 năm 2011 (3476 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Advice On Life From A Buddhist Monk


Brockton, MA (USA) -- Serenity may be closer than you think, but it takes a little discipline. A Buddhist monk offers suggestions on small ways you can change your life and find peace.

 1. Focus on the "now," says Samu Kim Sunin, founder of the Buddhist Society for Compassionate Wisdom, which has temples in Chicago, New York, Toronto, Mexico City and Ann Arbor, Mich.

Meditation is key, he says. Sit in silence, repeat a short phrase in your head, concentrate on breathing and think of yourself as part of nature.

"What happens (when you're done) is you are a calm, clear, genuine and authentic person, and other people benefit from that," Kim says.


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Ngày 23 tháng 03 năm 2011 (3849 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Kids' Games

Phantom Hands (indoor game)

Players: 2 or more; Lamp Keeper

Materials: Hooded desk lamp

           More of a trick than a game, Phantom Hands will still amuse your friends, if not spook them out of their wits. It’s a great stunt for a Halloween Party.

          This trick works by fooling the eyes into seeing something that isn’t really there through the effect of retinal afterimage.  You’ve probably already experienced something like it when a flashbulb popped in your face.


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Ngày 18 tháng 03 năm 2011 (4573 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: The Mendicant Saffron Robe: Origin and Significance

Kasaya in Sanskrit has nothing to do with clothing; it really means faded color, or muddy sludge, or perished and damaged. According to the Chinese texts, kasaya was transliterated to (1) fading color, or (2) dirty, polluted, thrashed, and also (3) neutral color or secondary color, or (4) tarnished, ruined, spoiled…
[Translator’s notes: The humble monk’s robe that historically the Buddha and his disciples wore, and now all the Buddhist monks are sporting in various shades of reddish-yellow, saffron or ochre colors are called Kesa in Japanese, Casa in Cantonese, Cà-sa in Vietnamese, has the root word kasaya in Sanskrit. For this article we will refer to it as Casa]


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Ngày 12 tháng 03 năm 2011 (5197 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Living In A Grateful World



Be grateful to those who have hurt or harmed you
For they have reinforced your determination
Be grateful to those who have made you stumble
For they have strengthened your ability
Be grateful to those who have abandoned you

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Ngày 09 tháng 03 năm 2011 (4261 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Compassion As The Pillar Of World Peace

According to Buddhist psychology, most of our troubles are due to our passionate desire for and attachment to things that we misapprehend as enduring entities. The pursuit of the objects of our desire and attachment involves the use of aggression and competitiveness as supposedly efficacious instruments. These mental processes easily translate into actions, breeding belligerence as an obvious effect. Such processes have been going on in the human mind since time immemorial, but their execution has become more effective under modern conditions. What can we do to control and regulate these 'poisons' - delusion, greed, and aggression? For it is these poisons that are behind almost every trouble in the world.

As one brought up in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, I feel that love and compassion are the moral fabric of world peace. Let me first define what I mean by compassion. When you have pity or compassion for a very poor person, you are showing sympathy because he or she is poor; your compassion is based on altruistic considerations. On the other hand, love towards your wife, your husband, your children, or a close friend is usually based on attachment. When your attachment changes, your kindness also changes; it may disappear. This is not true love. Real love is not based on attachment, but on altruism. In this case your compassion will remain as a humane response to suffering as long as beings continue to suffer.

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Ngày 08 tháng 03 năm 2011 (3949 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: The Emperor And The Flower Seeds

Long ago, in a faraway kingdom, there lived an Emperor who loved nature. Anything he planted burst into bloom. Up came flowers, bushes and even big fruit trees, as if by magic! Of everything in nature, he loved flowers most of all, and he tended his own garden every day. But the emperor was very old, and he needed to choose a successor to the throne. Who would his successor be? And how would the emperor decide? As the emperor loved flowers so much, he decided flowers would help him choose.

The next day, a proclamation was issued: “All men, women, boys and girls throughout the land are to come to the palace.” The news created great excitement throughout the land.

In a village not far from here, there lived a young girl named Serena. Serena had always wanted to visit the palace and see the Emperor, and so she decided to go. She was glad she went. How magnificent the palace was! It was made from gold and studded with jewels of every color and type – diamonds, rubies, emeralds, opals and amethysts. How the palace gleamed and sparkled! Serena felt that she had always known this place. She walked through the palace doors into the Great Hall, where she was overwhelmed by all the people. It was so noisy. “The whole kingdom must be here!” she thought.

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Ngày 05 tháng 03 năm 2011 (4203 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Living the Compassionate Life

Summary: This teaching by the Dalai Lama, adapted from The Compassionate Life published in 2001, explains how the Buddhist teachings of mindfulness and compassion lead inevitably to feelings of self-confidence and kindness.

As human beings we all have the potential to be happy and compassionate people, and we also have the potential to be miserable and harmful to others. The potential for all these things is present within each of us.

If we want to be happy, then the important thing is to try to promote the positive and useful aspects in each of us and to try to reduce the negative. Doing negative things, such as stealing and lying, may occasionally seem to bring some short-term satisfaction, but in the long term they will always bring us misery. Positive acts always bring us inner strength. With inner strength we have less fear and more self-confidence, and it becomes much easier to extend our sense of caring to others without any barriers, whether religious, cultural, or otherwise. It is thus very important to recognize our potential for both good and bad, and then to observe and analyze it carefully.


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Ngày 03 tháng 03 năm 2011 (4009 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Buddhistic Revelation to the Modern World


Engaged in life at the turn of a civilization, we must confront all crucial conflicts due to the chaos of differing ideologies mankind has been entangled in from the very beginning of civilization.
Engaged in life at the turn of a civilization, we must confront all crucial conflicts due to the chaos of differing ideologies mankind has been entangled in from the very beginning of civilization. The more we struggle and our efforts increase, the more exhausted and further down pressed into hopelessness and misdirection, and the heavier the loss of confidence in oneself. The social cataclysm has left its imprint on every man's face, the most deeply in the mind and heart of those in their twenties. At this particular impasse of history, it is the intelligentsia who is expected to lead us on the way to the final deliverance from human bondage.

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Ngày 26 tháng 02 năm 2011 (4174 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Kids' Games

Peanut Pitch (indoor game)

Players: 2 or more
Materials: 5 unshelled peanuts for each player, 3 bowls of different sizes that you can nest

Place the smallest bowl into the next smallest, and place both of those bowls into the larger bowl. Fill the center bowl with water, but pour just a little water into the surrounding bowls. If any of the bowls float, add more water to the center bowl and remove water from the surrounding bowls.


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Ngày 22 tháng 02 năm 2011 (3122 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Smile

 

 Smile at least once a day!

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Ngày 17 tháng 02 năm 2011 (4540 lần đọc)


Anh Ngữ: Happy Valentine


Ngày 14 tháng 02 năm 2011


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